Club Foot

 

After correction has been achieved, maintenance of correction may require the full-time (23 hours per day) use of a splint—also known as a foot abduction brace (FAB)—on both feet, regardless or whether the TEV is on one side or both, for several weeks after treatment. Part-time use of a brace (generally at night, usually 12 hours per day) is frequently prescribed for up to 4 years. Approximately 20% of infants successfully treated with the Ponseti casting method may require a surgical tendon transfer after two years of age. While this requires a general anesthetic, it is a relatively minor surgery that corrects a persistent muscle imbalance while avoiding disturbance to the joints of the foot.

The developer of the Ponseti Method, Dr Ignacio Ponseti, at 93 years of age is still treating children with clubfeet (including complex/atypical clubfeet and failed treatment clubfeet) at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. He is assisted by Dr Jose Morcuende, president of the Ponseti International Association.
The long-term outlook for children who experienced the Ponseti Method treatment is comparable to that of non-affected children.

 

 

 

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